Beauty Most Unusual: Now You’re Cooking With Pam!

Pam Quick Dry Spray for Nails

I’m a not nail girl but I’m pretty sure you….

Shouldn’t mist your nails with Pam. According to a suggestion in Woman’s World you can use Pam instead of a quick dry nail spray. Ummm computer says no. I dunno how good an idea it is to mist newly polished nails with Pam. Pam was created to allow food to slip and slide out of the pan so why would it benefit you to use it as a quick dry spray?

Wouldn’t it make nails and hands greasy? Would it smell bad (you know that fake buttery smell it has!)?

I’m just sayin’…I wouldn’t try it.

Beauty Most Unusual peeps.

Have you tried using Pam on your nails?

  • 1/10/13 14:04 00trayn:

    I saw this on Pinterest and I definitely won’t be trying it. I don’t want my hands to smell like that stuff! I did see a pin for dunking your hands in cold water for 5 minutes to dry the nails completely. Haven’t tried it, but that sounds much more reasonable.

    Reply

    • 1/10/13 17:19 Mel:

      Dunking your nails in cold water actually works!

      Reply

    • 1/10/13 20:37 Michou:

      The cold water trick works, but I’ll never try the Pam trick. Ew.

      Reply

      • 1/11/13 10:34 00trayn:

        Good to know, thanks for the first hand experience! (hehe, I made a pun…) Anyway, I’ll be trying that next time I do my nails.

        Reply

  • 1/10/13 14:07 Kimmwc03:

    Eww…no thanks.

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 14:08 Amy Amethyst:

    Um no, that’s just nooooo. If you don’t want to but the quick dry drops, then use a cuticle oil. But Pam? *shudders*

    Reply

    • 1/10/13 14:09 Amy Amethyst:

      *buy the quick dry I meant, not but

      Reply

  • 1/10/13 14:19 Icequeen81:

    doesnt sounds good indeed, I’m a clumsy so I wont try it

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 14:37 Cj:

    Eww are they out of their minds? Who in their right mind would spray Pam on their nails lol.

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 14:42 AnnaCatherine:

    They sell a quick dry spray at Sally’s and my Walmart and Walgreens for under 10 bucks I’m sure for this very purpose. I mean, I’m all for finding cool beauty “home remedies” but this doesn’t seem quite right. I’d love to hear from people that tried it, but in the mean time I’m gunna stick with my quick dry top coat I think lol!

    Reply

    • 1/10/13 16:28 Debster:

      I really like the quick dry spray! I hadn’t used it in a while, but I don’t remember it even having a scent. There wasn’t any residue like Pam would leave. XP

      Reply

      • 1/10/13 16:44 AnnaCatherine:

        I’ve tried 2 different sprays I think. The first one I tried I LOVED and it worked so well. No scent and it really did dry my nails fast. But now I can’t find that one and I tried another one and it works but the scent is sooooo strong I feel like I can’t use it without opening a window. Not necessarily a bad scent but just so strong.

        Reply

      • 1/10/13 16:48 amy:

        The spray specifically made for nails *does* leave a residue, and it smells like cheap hairspray. I’ve used several brands, but they’re all the same. I’ve accidentally sprayed cooking spray on my hands, and it comes off *alot* more easily than nail spray. As for scent, I don’t prefer one over the other, but both (again) are easily remedied by washing hands with soap & water, which is something I already do on a regular basis.

        Reply

        • 1/10/13 20:09 AnnaCatherine:

          Yeah I never had a problem getting the nail spray smell off my hands cuz it’s easy enough to wash those a few times but the smell lingers in my room and I have scent triggered migraines and one of the worst offenders are those cheap perfume/hairspray smells. I might just have to try the Pam spray cuz that smell doesn’t give me headaches and if it really works like some people are sayin that’s totally awesome!

          Reply

  • 1/10/13 14:57 amy:

    I do my nails at night, before bed, so I may try this. I wash my hands after several minutes, with sop (I typically use jojoba oil, anyway), and I shower in the morning, so I don’t think smell would be an issue. Besides, whenever I use this stuff for cooking, inevitably it gets on my hands, and it washes away easily then, so I would think it would wash off if I used it to dry my nails.

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 15:04 liv:

    This works, it’s really not that bad, but only use it for quick manis on the go because it seems to make polish chip faster. It’s really quick a neat trick.

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 15:36 Mimi:

    lol, I thought it was just Cosmo that gave out wacky advice. XD

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 15:57 Melissa:

    This actually does work. It seemed to do the same job as the quick dry drops I use, which are made up of oils (like shea nut, jojoba or Vitamin E), fragrance, and silicones. So it is not as crazy as it sounds.

    I used the olive oil Crisco spray and let the oil soak in to my hands like a moisturizing treatment. :-)

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 16:19 Shelby:

    This reminded me of something, there was this book at the library that I would always read part of each time I went. It was called “Paint Your House With Powdered Milk” it had all sorts of uses for house hold products, thats where I learn about mayo in the hair. I can’t remember any others but maybe I’ll try to get my hands on it.

    Reply

    • 1/11/13 7:22 TwirlyGirly:

      Oh boy, did your comment about using mayo as a hair cinditioner bring back memories! Many moons ago (I’m not saying how many moons, but suffice it to say it’s in the thousands), I read that tip in a teen magazine (perhaps Seventeen).

      Within the week, I had raided the fridge and salthered mayo all over my hair to deep condition it. What the tip had failed to mention was how difficult it would be to wash the stuff completely out of the hair.

      I remember going to school (high school) the next day, and in almost every class at least one student would sniff the air and say “Is someone eating salad?”

      I was so embarrassed I never tried it again!

      Reply

  • 1/10/13 17:32 Jackie:

    The best nail drying thing I’ve found is a topcoat by Orly, Sec’n’Dry, that is a multi-layer quick-dry topcoat. I love this stuff.

    Reply

    • 1/15/13 12:31 Kara:

      I like the Sec-N-Dri as well. But hands down (pun intended), the best I’ve ever tried is Seche Vite Dry Fast Top Coat.

      Reply

  • 1/10/13 19:28 Jeri:

    I use oil so I’m sure this would work. The smell may be too much.

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 19:53 CHASE!:

    To quote Ms. GaGa herself “excuse me no”

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 20:34 Angela:

    Um definitely a no.

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 20:42 Tartelette:

    Actually I have tried this and it does work. I saw it first recommended on Rupaul’s Drag Race about 2 yrs ago and laughed too at first. When my top coat was goopy I finally decided it was worth a try. It’s not a go to, but in a pinch it dries them instantly.

    Reply

  • 1/10/13 21:13 elle:

    it works, it’s just too gross and messy that it ends up not being worth it

    Reply

  • 1/11/13 2:14 Tiffany Martin:

    Sounds like it wouldn’t work and it’d make you greasy… I mean, if you had no polish on and you wanted some like cuticle oil and this was the apocalypse okay, maybe.

    Reply

  • 1/11/13 3:52 Marta:

    I’m not sure what Pam is, but I think we might have to destroy it. If it’s cooking related, then the idea is gross. If people want to save money, Essence express dry nail drops only costs like 3$, doesn’t smell and lasts for ages.

    Reply

  • 1/11/13 7:51 TwirlyGirly:

    The ingredients in the original formula PAM are canola oil, grain alcohol (made from corn), lecithin, and propellant.

    It’s the grain alcohol that smells, but it evaporates very quickly. The grain alcohol is used (in a very small amount) to add claity to the spray, so it doesn’t look cloudy.

    Lecithin is harmless. It’s a naturally occuring mixture of the diglycerides of stearic, palmitic and oleic acids. It’s used in a large number of cosmetics and personal care products as an emulsifier. Lecithin enhances the appearance of dry or damaged skin by reducing flaking and restoring suppleness – so it’s actually good for your hands!

    While ANY oil can be used to help polish dry faster, obviously an oil in a spray form would be quicker and easier to use.

    BTW, a popular aerosol nail polish drying spray, made by Beauty Secrets, is chock full of chemicals:

    SD ALCOHOL 40-B ,CYCLOPENTASILOXANE ,CYCLOHEXASILOXANE ,TOCOPHERYL ACETATE ,PANTHENOL ,AMP-ISOSTEAROYL HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN ,FRAGRANCE ,ISOBUTANE ,PROPANE ,ALPHA ISOMETHYL IONONE ,BENZYL ALCOHOL ,BENZYL BENZOATE ,CITRONELLOL ,EUGENOL ,LINALOOL

    So, if one were looking for a more “natural” product to aid in drying nail polish, PAM would be the better way to go!

    Reply

  • 1/11/13 8:43 AnniLau:

    This seems as good a place to mention this as anywhere else: Zoya is running a promotion right now where you can get 3 polished for free with code ZOYA2013. You do pay $10 in shipping.

    Reply

  • 1/11/13 13:16 Tiffany C.:

    There is a youtube video of a girl doing this and it actually worked!!!

    Reply

  • 1/13/13 15:56 Smidge:

    I’m honestly more worried about telling someone to scrub with baking soda. If you’re acne prone, the alkalinity of the baking soda will change the pH in your skin and actually make you produce MORE acne bacteria. It drives me nuts when people don’t check for stuff like that before they recommend at-home remedies.

    But, yes, the PAM thing sounds nuts. At least your hands will be soft…?

    Reply

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